Some Leadership / Church bits

14 Oct

My commentary in blue, on some random leadership reading this AM.

Chuck Swindoll on leadership from CAT09

 

10 Things Chuck Swindoll Learned in 50ish Years of Ministry:

  1. It’s lonely to lead.
    Leadership involves tough decisions. The tougher the decisions, the lonelier it is.
  2. It’s dangerous to succeed.
    It is dangerous to succeed while being young. rarely, does God give leadership that young because it takes crushing and failure first.
  3. It’s hardest at home.
    Nobody at home is applauding you. They say, “Dad! You’re fly is open.”
  4. It is essential to be real.
    If there is one realm where phoniness is personified it is leadership. What I care about is that you stay real.
  5. It is painful to obey.
    There are rewards, yes, but it is painful nevertheless.
  6. Brokenness and failure are necessary.
  7. My attitude is more important than my actions.
    Some of you are getting hard to be around. And your attitude covers all those great actions you pull off.
  8. Integrity eclipses image.
    What you are doing is not a show. And the best things you are doing is not up front but what you do behind the scenes.
  9. God’s way is better than my way.
    God is going to have His way.
  10. Christ-likeness begins and ends with humility.

100% agree with the above, and I’m a bit far from 50 years in leadership… many of these I picked up pretty early on despite the school of slam head into the wall. Such a process is usually is slow and painful, but the concepts do come to light pretty fast.

***************************************************************************************

Some commentary on Frank Viola’s book from Tony Morgan’s blog.
At 2008-01-03 08:36:03 Art said:
“They will bring their own songs, they will write their own songs, they will minister out of what Christ has shown them–with no human leader present!”Um… no they won’t. They won’t do much of anything without a leader. They won’t even clear the 16 inches of snow (don’t you miss northern Indiana Tony?) off the church steps and handicap ramp. They leave it for the “leader” to do it alone. They won’t bring food for the food pantry. “Leader’s” job. They won’t even show up to worship let alone write their own songs.Barna and Viola overestimate the commitment that nominal Christians have to anything. Sheep won’t do much else but die without a shepherd

At 2008-01-03 10:59:55 Derek said:
Art: “Barna and Viola overestimate the commitment that nominal Christians have to anything. Sheep won’t do much else but die without a shepherd.”This cracks me up. The passive spectator mentality is a byproduct of the presentational style of worship/teaching, and then you say house church can’t work? One of the reasons I’ve been drawn to house church is because of it works against people’s tendencies to be docile. We’ve had people leave our house church because they just wanted to sit in a pew and “be fed.” That’s exactly the kind of damage Viola speaks of.

Ouch, on the sit in a pew and “be fed” mentality, but its true, same deal with Art’s comment. To put on blinders and not admit such doesnt happen, egads…Ultimately, docility is likely human nature, but rather than embracing it, and encouraging it with a specific leadership model, it should be challenged.. and when its not challenged for a period of time, there will be huge problems. In many ways, I dont know that said problems once ingrained are correctable without starting over.

From a starting gate pov, I do think most will rise to the task, but what about those who don’t? What about those who can’t? They should not be left out in the cold.

*****************************************************************8

5 Traits of the New Creative Leader
 
Yesterday’s leadership skills will not work in today’s fast-moving and evolving world. Only creative leaders who are visionary and empathetic will succeed. Here are five things you can do to succeed as a creative leader:

  1. Instead of commanding, coach your team and organization toward success.
  2. Don’t manage people, empower them. The know-how, experience, and solutions are often out there; it’s a matter of helping people discover them.
  3. Cultivate respect by giving it, instead of demanding it.
  4. Know how to manage both success and failure.
  5. Show graciousness in your management rather than greediness. Be humble about your successes and whenever possible, give someone else the opportunity to shine.
from tip of the day, Harvard Business Publishing http://hbdm.harvardbusiness.org/email/archive/managementtip.php?date=101409

All good things… well pretty obvious things too, except the part about managing failure. That one is far too often overlooked, but I think its critical. In many ways, its one of those things a guy picks up early on, like right out of school etc… and if one doesnt along the way, there can be some pretty rude awakenings in their future. Often times failure management is more critical than on the success side… unless one always plays things so safe, as to never fail, but then thats sort of a failure right from the get go anyhow.

************************************************************

Five Statements Worth Remembering During Your Next 50 Years of Leadership: from Chuck Swindoll

  1. Whatever you do, do more with others and less alone.
    It will help you become accountable.
  2. Whenever you do it, emphasize quality not quantity.
  3. Wherever you go, do it the same as if you were among those who know you the best.
    It will keep you from exaggerating. it will help keep your stories true. Your good friend will tell you things that others will not. They will hold you close to truth.
  4. Whoever may respond to your ministry, keep a level head.
  5. However long you lead, keep on dripping with gratitude and grace.
    Stay thankful. Stay gracious.
Whatever you do, do more with others and less alone It will help you become accountable.

True… its very easy for lone ranger types to go off the reservation… however, a big contraindication to this, is the makeup of the others. Ie a group of yes men is pretty much worthless accountability wise. Same deal with a group who embraces the status quo, and who do not want to grow. Doing more with others can be a very a good thing, but it has to be the right type of others, or it can be a major disaster. Getting those others, ie building the right team is the challenge. 

Wherever you go, do it the same as if you were among those who know you the best. It will keep you from exaggerating. it will help keep your stories true. Your good friend will tell you things that others will not. They will hold you close to truth.

Ah, and there in lies an issue too… far too often best friends are either yes men, or are birds of a feather. Few will embrace diversity, and of those that do, it can serve to drive a wedge between folks, and thus knowing one another really well becomes self limiting. I’m not saying Chuck is wrong… but there is a lot of nuance to this.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: